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Advocates Improving Intersections In Hampshire County

Last weekend, a dozen volunteers braved the chilly New England Fall weather to work on making intersections in Northampton and Amherst better for bicyclists. Through a partnership with the Hampshire Council of Governments, and thanks to our partnership with Mass in Motion, we were able to come out and train local bicyclists how to use […]

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Check Out Our New Bikeability Report

You might remember last month when two MassBike staff went to Greenfield to undertake a Bikeability Assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to feed into a regional Complete Streets Plan, which would lay the groundwork for improvements in Franklin County’s streets. We were joined by ten local residents to help with the assessment, and […]

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Completing Streets In Franklin County

On Monday, August 6, our Program Associate Sam Markovitz and I went out to Franklin County to help local residents and the Franklin Regional Council of Governments (FRCOG) perform a Bikeability Assessment in Greenfield, Colrain and South Deerfield. There were roughly a dozen people present to help with the assessment, which was undertaken to inform […]

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Bikeable Communities Guide and Training

  MassBike is proud to present a brand new resource to help advocates around Massachusetts make their communities’ roads better for biking. This guide, Shifting Gears: An Introduction to Better Biking for your Community, is designed to open the door for people who want to make things better for bicyclists, but don’t know how to […]

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Victory For Biking On Casey Overpass Project

Thanks to the hard work of MassBike and many other advocacy organizations (most notably the Boston Cyclists Union, and also the Livable Streets Alliance and WalkBoston), the Massachusetts Department of Transportation announced earlier this month that the Casey Overpass will be brought at-grade. As Transportation Secretary Richard Davey stated, “The decision was made after an […]

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The Long View Of The Longfellow Bridge

MassDOT recently released the long-awaited Environmental Assessment for the Longfellow Bridge reconstruction project, which reveals the design MassDOT has chosen for the bridge. To its credit, MassDOT clearly listened to much of the input from the Longfellow Bridge Task Force (on which I served): As seen above, the outbound (Boston-to-Cambridge) side of the bridge as […]

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MassDOT, Make The Fore River Bridge Better For Biking

On Thursday, February 9th I attended a public hearing in the Town of Weymouth on the Fore River Bridge Replacement Project. This bridge, part of the Accelerated Bridge Program, is the main connector between Quincy (and the City of Boston) and points further down on the South Shore, as proven by the fact that it […]

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Critical Meeting For Casey Overpass This Monday!

If you follow our blog, you’ve probably heard now and again about the Casey Overpass project near the Forest Hills MBTA Station. This is a major project with the potential to remake and reconnect the neighborhoods around the station, linking them with each other, parks, businesses, and transit. If you live in or travel through […]

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Biking The Charles With MassDOT And DCR

I spent half a day last week riding around the Charles River Basin looking at the bridges, intersections, and paths, and identifying problems and brainstorming solutions with fellow advocates from WalkBoston, LivableStreets Alliance, Boston Cyclists Union, and the Esplanade Association. We work with these groups regularly, but this gathering was noteworthy because we were all […]

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“Working” On The Casey Overpass

The Casey Overpass is a four-lane, raised section of Route 203, connecting the Arborway to Forest Hills Cemetery and Franklin Park in Boston’s Jamaica Plain neighborhood. It passes over the Southwest Corridor and Forest Hills Station. The structure was built in 1954, but 57 years later it is structurally unsound and splits the community in […]

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